Well Pumps (81 items found)

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Whether you're a full-time homesteader or a weekend vacationer, if you spend time in rural areas, you'll quickly learn the value of gathering essential resources. One of the most important steps to take is to guarantee your own water supply, whether it's your only source or a backup to the public supply. Using a well is the traditional choice, but for convenience and reliability, fitting a high-quality pump is important.

Choose a specially designed well pump rather than a general-purpose model or sump pump, as you'll need to secure your water supply under all conditions. 

There are three main types of well pumps to consider, depending mainly on the depth of your well. Learn what you need to know when making your choice here.

Jet Pumps for Shallow Wells 

The first type, known as jet pumps, are suitable for fairly shallow wells where the water surface is up to 25 feet below ground. Jet pumps are installed above ground in a well housing and use suction to pull the water to the surface. They offer a cost-effective and reliable pumping solution in areas where the water table is dependably high.

Submersible Well Pumps for Deeper Wells 

For deeper wells, a submersible well pump is a more efficient and practical type of device. As the name suggests, with a submersible pump the mechanism is fixed below the water level. It uses pressure from below (rather than suction) to push the water upwards.

Submersible models make an effective deep well pump when the water surface is up to 300 feet below ground. They can also produce a stronger and more consistent flow than jet pumps, making them ideal if your well is the only water source available.

Convertible Jet Pumps 

However, for wells with water table depth that varies widely, a convertible jet pump may make the best choice. By changing the settings of the ejector assembly, the same pump can be adapted to work at depths of up to 90 feet.

With convertible pumps, you can use an energy-efficient low-power setting when the water table is high, then switch to stronger pumping when you need to go to greater depths.

Extra Well Pump Features 

As well as choosing between a jet, submersible or convertible model, there are several other features to look out for when deciding on a pump.

  • Power Source: A battery backup feature is useful in areas where power can be unreliable.
  • Maximum Flow: The amount of water a pump can supply is measured in gallons per minute (GPM). A higher GPM figure means you'll have quicker access to water but it'll take more energy to pump.
  • Storage Tank: For less powerful pumps, a storage tank can help to even out the supply.
  • Outlet Connections: For basic pumping situations, a single outlet connection may be enough, however, multiple outlets will make it easier to combine a full indoor supply with outdoor irrigation.

A high-quality well pump will provide years of reliable use. If you need any help deciding on a model, contact us online or come into your local Ace to discuss your options.